(via film on Behance)
(via Body on Behance)
“river mist and quicksilver…” 

(via “river mist and quicksilver…” | Life Through Blue Eyes)

“river mist and quicksilver…”

(via “river mist and quicksilver…” | Life Through Blue Eyes)

1bohemian:

Flight Engineer

1bohemian:

Flight Engineer

(via alter43)

#AtoZAprilChallenge: Liberal

Women's march on Versailles From Wiktionary: “adjective: either

Of or relating to the Liberal party, its membership, or its platform, policy, or viewpoint

Or

Generous, in great amount, a large proportion.

Noun: (politics) a member or supporter of a liberal party

UK (historically) Whig

In Raymond Williams: “Liberalhas, at first sight, so clear a political meaning that some of its further associations are puzzling. Yet the…

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mpdrolet:

Georgette à table, 1933-35
René Magritte

mpdrolet:

Georgette à table, 1933-35

René Magritte

theperfectworldwelcome:

Beautiful !!!\O/

theperfectworldwelcome:

Beautiful !!!\O/

(Source: chicparadise2, via lalulutres)

Tags: flight

In his seminal essay “The Grain of the Voice,” French philosopher Roland Barthes asserts the failure of language to interpret music for the precise reason that language and music are one in the same. Needing no self-projection to justify its existence, music is a signifier without identity that expresses its materiality by what he calls the “grain.” During a recent interview with between sound and space, guitarist Bruce Eisenbeil, who alongside bassist Tom Blancarte and drummer Andrew Drury is part of the free improvisation triangle known as TOTEM>, explains the importance of the grain in a mode of sonic production that may seem far afield of its roots but which in fact burrows past them: 
“The history of what I’ve been involved with, which is jazz-based, brought me to these sounds. When I look at the music of, for instance, of Cecil Taylor, John Coltrane, and Albert Ayler, and how each had his own musical influence—for Taylor it was classical; for Coltrane, world music; and for Ayler, folk—as a springboard for improvisation, I see those same influences in my own evolution. All of this and more, including contemporary classical music from the second half of the twentieth century (Xenakis, Reich, Lachenmann, etc.), has made me realize that playing guitar is in large part about imitating my own environment. It’s not unlike a child who acquires language just by being around family members and learning to communicate. For me, it’s as simple as that. I take everything I’ve ever heard or experienced and pass it through my filter, using my guitar as an instrument for the exploration of that sound by way of communication. So concepts of music, noise, or sound—really, all of these things are part of the same thing.” 

(via Exploding the Sandbox: A Moment with TOTEM> | between sound and space)

In his seminal essay “The Grain of the Voice,” French philosopher Roland Barthes asserts the failure of language to interpret music for the precise reason that language and music are one in the same. Needing no self-projection to justify its existence, music is a signifier without identity that expresses its materiality by what he calls the “grain.” During a recent interview with between sound and space, guitarist Bruce Eisenbeil, who alongside bassist Tom Blancarte and drummer Andrew Drury is part of the free improvisation triangle known as TOTEM>, explains the importance of the grain in a mode of sonic production that may seem far afield of its roots but which in fact burrows past them:
“The history of what I’ve been involved with, which is jazz-based, brought me to these sounds. When I look at the music of, for instance, of Cecil Taylor, John Coltrane, and Albert Ayler, and how each had his own musical influence—for Taylor it was classical; for Coltrane, world music; and for Ayler, folk—as a springboard for improvisation, I see those same influences in my own evolution. All of this and more, including contemporary classical music from the second half of the twentieth century (Xenakis, Reich, Lachenmann, etc.), has made me realize that playing guitar is in large part about imitating my own environment. It’s not unlike a child who acquires language just by being around family members and learning to communicate. For me, it’s as simple as that. I take everything I’ve ever heard or experienced and pass it through my filter, using my guitar as an instrument for the exploration of that sound by way of communication. So concepts of music, noise, or sound—really, all of these things are part of the same thing.”

(via Exploding the Sandbox: A Moment with TOTEM> | between sound and space)

Tentakelhaar, das hier und da feine graue Strähnen zeigt. Wellen formen Wesen, streifen umher auf meinem Gesicht. 

(via selfish, narcissistic | human)

Tentakelhaar, das hier und da feine graue Strähnen zeigt. Wellen formen Wesen, streifen umher auf meinem Gesicht.

(via selfish, narcissistic | human)

photonude:

The Field Of Cereal #1
http://www.artlimited.net/image/en/463719
Copyright © Alan Cat

Tags: Alan Cat